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lookuplookup:

"There are consequences when you make a mistake like that. I stand behind Ray, he’s a heck of a guy, he’s done everything right since. He makes a mistake, he’s gonna have to pay a consequence. […] I think that’s good for kids to understand it works that way, that’s how it works, that’s how it…

I would totally contribute to that kickstarter.

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birthmoviesdeath:

Walking in like you own the room with Don Knotts - GM

<3

birthmoviesdeath:

Walking in like you own the room with Don Knotts - GM

<3

Photoset

note-a-bear:

thinksquad:

Back in 2013, Texas resident Larry Davis ran either a red light or stop sign (reports vary) in his Buick in the city of Austin. Despite his insistence that he had had only one drink, he was put in handcuffs and arrested for driving while intoxicated. Then, when he was given a Breathalyzer test by the Austin Police Department, he blew a 0.00. Nonetheless, as KVUE reports, Mr. Davis spent the night in jail.

While at the station, Mr. Davis agreed to give a blood sample as well, to prove he was not under the influence of any drugs or alcohol. The results would later come back 100% negative. Davis’ attorney, Daniel Betts, told KVUE, “My reaction was just shock that this happened.”

The Austin Police Department stands by the arrest, saying they believed Davis showed signs of impairment, that while standing on one leg, he “swayed,” and “needed his arms for balance.” They also suggested that he could have been on marijuana, a drug that wouldn’t necessarily show up in a test. The APD said they’re going by a “take-no-chances” policy. That being said, they did acknowledge how unusual it is that Davis was arrested despite registering a zero on his breath test.

:|

they ain’t even trying to hide they shit anymore

News flash: APD has a big racism problem.  (Oh, wait. Everyone knows that.) 

(via sonsofsauron)

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"We are prescribing for fat people what we diagnose as disordered eating in thin people."

— Deb Burgard, keynote at the 2011 NAAFA conference (via loniemc)

(via agreekdoctor)

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bisexual-books:

a-little-bi-furious:

nobodysgrrrrl:

freelgbtqpia:


"He doesn’t mean to hurt me-he just loses control." “He can be sweet and gentle.” “He’s scared me a few times, but he never hurts the children-he’s a great father.” “He’s had a really hard life…”  Women in abusive relationships tell themselves these things every day. Now they can see inside the minds of angry and controlling men-and change their own lives. In this groundbreaking book, a counselor shows how to improve, survive, or leave an abusive relationship, with:  € The early warning signs € Nine abusive personality types € How to tell if an abuser can change, is changing, or ever will € The role of drugs and alcohol € What can be fixed, and what can’t € How to leave a relationship safely

[PDF]

This book is an excellent resource for anyone you know who is, or you suspect is, in an abusive relationship.

Hi this has an old link that expired, the original post has been fixed and you can find the pdf here. 

Even though this book is really focused on straight relationships and the abuse patterns of straight men, I found parts of it really helpful to me as a bi woman whose abuser was another woman.  
- Sarah

Not only was this book extremely helpful to me as a DV survivor&#8212;it&#8217;s the reason I was finally able to see my abuse for what it was and has helped a great deal with my recovery&#8212;I have talked to countless DV survivors in various settings who swear by this book and benefited a great deal from reading it. Bancroft worked with abusers for years before writing this book and it shows. He really nails the abuser mentality in a way that is so clear and that helps a lot with the process of un-brainwashing yourself after abuse. Every time I get to know someone new who is a survivor of IPV I recommend this book to them. Whenever possible I recommend purchasing it so that Bancroft can continue to do this useful work, but it&#8217;s great to see a pdf available for those who aren&#8217;t able to get it by other means. Very highly recommended. 

bisexual-books:

a-little-bi-furious:

nobodysgrrrrl:

freelgbtqpia:

"He doesn’t mean to hurt me-he just loses control."
“He can be sweet and gentle.”
“He’s scared me a few times, but he never hurts the children-he’s a great father.”
“He’s had a really hard life…”

Women in abusive relationships tell themselves these things every day. Now they can see inside the minds of angry and controlling men-and change their own lives. In this groundbreaking book, a counselor shows how to improve, survive, or leave an abusive relationship, with:

€ The early warning signs
€ Nine abusive personality types
€ How to tell if an abuser can change, is changing, or ever will
€ The role of drugs and alcohol
€ What can be fixed, and what can’t
€ How to leave a relationship safely

[PDF]

This book is an excellent resource for anyone you know who is, or you suspect is, in an abusive relationship.

Hi this has an old link that expired, the original post has been fixed and you can find the pdf here.

Even though this book is really focused on straight relationships and the abuse patterns of straight men, I found parts of it really helpful to me as a bi woman whose abuser was another woman.  

- Sarah

Not only was this book extremely helpful to me as a DV survivor—it’s the reason I was finally able to see my abuse for what it was and has helped a great deal with my recovery—I have talked to countless DV survivors in various settings who swear by this book and benefited a great deal from reading it. Bancroft worked with abusers for years before writing this book and it shows. He really nails the abuser mentality in a way that is so clear and that helps a lot with the process of un-brainwashing yourself after abuse. Every time I get to know someone new who is a survivor of IPV I recommend this book to them. Whenever possible I recommend purchasing it so that Bancroft can continue to do this useful work, but it’s great to see a pdf available for those who aren’t able to get it by other means. Very highly recommended. 

Link

desidere:

feminismandflowers:

desidere:

feminismandflowers:

being femme is not about being feminine. it’s about reclaiming what it is to be strong.

people read as feminine have also been condemned as weak, frail, unauthentic, and incapable as long as time is old. being…

Bravo & thank you.

Quote
"

When I started dating women I began to identify as lesbian, as it was most fitting — and best understood by community around me. Saying I was bisexual brought along too many misconceptions that I wasn’t able or willing to battle with. My sexual identity was interpreted as being less about love and more about sex.

My bisexuality doesn’t reflect how active my libido is, nor does it mean that I’m confused about my identity.

"

I’m Going Back to Bi: Confessions of a Former Lesbian | Rebby Kern for the Advocate  (via gaywrites)

(via bisexual-books)

Link

tomewing:

And - crucially - less (even less!) fun. This is where the comparisons with astrology - which Vox, of course, makes - are both instructive and useless. Certainly Myers-Briggs brings out the long-buried snooty empiricist bro in me, the way astrology does in yr average ‘rationalist’. If I meet someone at work who is into Myers-Briggs then I kind of do judge them and look down on them a bit, which is horrible but we all have our heuristics and there’s mine.

But astrology is a bit of shared culture, a decision-making prompt, something you can read out loud in the pub and laugh at or with, a social game, a way to start conversations, a route in (however arbitrary) to self-analysis… you can also pin the “of course I don’t BELIEVE in it” badge on yourself, well done, collect your science points at the door, but as a bit of cultural machinery astrology has uses well beyond the claims it makes or is assumed to make. (Assuming everybody who talks about star signs believes in astrology as a scientific system is a bit like believing that people who put #screaming in a hashtag are actually sitting at their computers screaming)

Some of this stuff is true of Myers-Briggs as well, it’s a social object in the drearier kind of workplace, but a) actual hiring and promotion decisions get made on this stuff so belief or stated belief is backed up by genuine action, making this yet another hoop young people* are FORCED to jump through and b) it is a really INERT cultural object - there’s no applications, no jokes, no equivalent of a horoscope - my Myers-Briggs “type”, whatever the fuck it turns out to be each time I do it, creates far less serendipitous value in my life than my star sign.

*(it is mostly younger people, I’d hypothesise - once you’ve been in the workplace for a few years interviews start getting based on what you’ve done… though I would ALSO hypothesise that people who aren’t straight white guys feel the lash of psychometric testing more in general - if you’ve decided you don’t want to hire someone for prejudiced reasons, conscious or otherwise, psychometrics provide a useful excuse. But I’ve no proof of that, and this is a wider issue than the Myers Briggs test.)

Good article, interesting commentary. I hate the MBTI for a number of reasons but one of the biggest is that I come down around the 50/50 mark on three out of the four dimensions it measures (I’m decidedly “N” but it depends on the day whether it considers me an E or an I, a T or a P, a P or a J). Its conceptualization of introversion and extraversion is also bothersome—it frequently conflates introversion with social anxiety, feeding into the popular misconception that they’re the same thing. The idea of people making hiring decisions based on this thing is horrifying. 

Link

tomewing:

minimoonstar:

tomewing:

minimoonstar said: I dunno - Myers-Briggs is used exactly like a astrological social object in online Fandom and has been for years (lots of INxx in Fandom; INxx think being an INxx is flattering). Work uses stuff like Strength Finder or Big Five, never seen MB there.

That’s really…

Forgot to say that McGill MBA was into Strength Finder, so maybe this is rooted in whatever system your local MBA feeder school pushes, like footballing styles.

But the impression I got wasn’t that HR dep’ts decided Myers-Briggs was fluffier than some other personality system, more that they’ve become more directly utilitarian: what you really want to know is which of the 10 communication styles a person falls into, or what they’re validated by / stressed out by / etc., so that you know how to deal with them at work. (Which is to say, I’ve never seen this stuff used in hiring, either, only for “engagement” and internal manager training.)

I think I’d be hugely wary of it even in that. If you’ve got a segmentation system which is inconsistent over half the time, AND which has enough cultural traction that people have begun to know how to game it, how reliably useful a tool have you got?

(Maybe if you just embraced MBTI’s social object status and said to people - which of these things are you most like? which are you least like? - that would send the “we care about your communications comfort in the workplace” message without being reliant on pseudo-rigorous test results. Even so - SIXTEEN different things? Mind you I was always the kind of gamer who disliked D&D because of the alignment system.)

Re: the idea of the “what are you like/not like?” questionnaire—in a sense this is what most personality tests for laypeople boil down to. If it’s face-valid, the person taking the assessment knows more or less what the items are measuring. A test of this sort might reconceptualize something for you, describe it in a way you hadn’t thought about, or provide a way to get some new ideas about how to work with your personality traits, but it’s not ultimately going to tell you something new about yourself. At best it will provide you with a new term for something you already knew or maybe highlight different aspects of it. But this isn’t very likely to happen if you’re psychologically-minded or even just a bit on the introspective, observant side, because the insights they offer are generally pretty modest. 

There are two main ways a personality test can truly provide you with information you didn’t have about yourself. 1) If it’s normed, it can tell you about how you compare to other people. For example, it can tell you if something is clinically significant (i.e. would benefit from psychological treatment) or if you have more or less of a certain quality (introversion, neuroticism, etc.) than average. 2) If it’s a projective assessment (the most well-known example is the Rorschach), a test can gather information about you without tipping you off as to what that information is. These tests have other issues, though—most importantly that they have lower validity and have to be interpreted by mental health professionals. 

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this-is-not-jewish:

If you’ve spent any time discussing or reading about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, I guarantee you’ve heard some variation of this statement:

OMG, Jews think any criticism of Israel is anti-Semitic!

In the interests of this post, I’m going to assume that the people who express such…